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Technical term for water entering a semipermeable membrane?

Technical term for water entering a semipermeable membrane?



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Would the word happen to be diffuse? I have tried imbibtion but that word is invalid because it isn't specific to osmosis.

Research: http://www.majordifferences.com/2013/12/difference-between-osmosis-and.html#.V9xc4fkrLIU


This is not imbibition, as water molecules don't get absorbed in the semipermeable membranes commonly found in biological structures like Membrane around cells and cellular organelles (I took this example as you asked it in Biology forum). The water molecules pass through biological membranes via protein channels, that may be an active, secondarily active or passive process. Percolation and permeation are also inappropriate.

If the membrane doesn't hinder a particular solvent it can be said to be permeable to that solvent (e.g. Permeable to water etc.). "Osmosis" is also applicable. As osmosis is only a type of diffusion, you can use the term 'diffusion', but it would be too broad or generalized.


I am not quite sure what you are looking for but maybe the termpassive transportwill satisfy your needs although it is not specific to water.

Passive Transport is a movement of biochemicals and other atomic or molecular substances across cell membranes without need of energy input. Unlike active transport, it does not require an input of cellular energy because it is instead driven by the tendency of the system to grow in entropy.


HYPERTONIC

A hypertonic solution is one with a high concentration of solutes when compared to another solution which is separated from it by a semipermeable membrane . The property of tonicity is often used to illustrate the biology of the body, with the solute concentration of cells and surrounding fluids being used as an example. Tonicity is related to osmosis , in which fluids flow back and forth across a semipermeable membrane osmolarity differs from tonicity in that it considers the concentration of solutes that penetrate the membrane and those that do not, while tonicity only considers those that do not penetrate.

If a solution is hypertonic, it means that fluid will flow across the membrane and into the hypertonic solution until an isotonic state is reached. In an isotonic state, the solutions on either side of the membrane have the same distribution of solutes. Conversely, with a hypotonic solution, the concentration of solutes is lower than that of a solution on the other side of a membrane, which means that water will be drawn out of the hypotonic solution and into a hypertonic solution.


Osmosis

Osmosis is a special case of diffusion. Instead of observing the net change in solute, osmosis follows the net movement of solvent across a semipermeable membrane . Since a semi-permeable membrane permits specific things to pass through, some solutes are partitioned.

A cell lacking a cell wall is affected greatly by the tonicity of the environment. In a hypertonic solution where the concentration of dissolved solute is high, water will be drawn out of the cell. In a hypotonic solution where the concentration of dissolved solute is lower than the interior of the cell, the cell will be under great osmotic pressure from the environmental water moving in and can rupture.

Plants have rigid cell walls composed of cellulose. These cell walls permit for maintenance of cellular integrity when the external environment is hypotonic (less dissolved substances) . In this situation, the water moves into the cell. Without the cell wall, the cell would burst open from the excessive water pressure entering the cell. This state of swelling is referred to as turgid, resulting from turgor pressure .

Cell walls of a plant retain the shape of the cell despite the state of external tonicity.
When the exterior environment is hypertonic , (greater amount of dissolved substances), the reverse condition occurs whereby the cellular fluid exiting the cell reduces the size of the cytoplasm. This condition is referred to as plasmolysis


Key Terms

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    Membrane

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    Membrane, in biology, the thin layer that forms the outer boundary of a living cell or of an internal cell compartment. The outer boundary is the plasma membrane, and the compartments enclosed by internal membranes are called organelles. Biological membranes have three primary functions: (1) they keep toxic substances out of the cell (2) they contain receptors and channels that allow specific molecules, such as ions, nutrients, wastes, and metabolic products, that mediate cellular and extracellular activities to pass between organelles and between the cell and the outside environment and (3) they separate vital but incompatible metabolic processes conducted within organelles.

    Membranes consist largely of a lipid bilayer, which is a double layer of phospholipid, cholesterol, and glycolipid molecules that contains chains of fatty acids and determines whether a membrane is formed into long flat sheets or round vesicles. Lipids give cell membranes a fluid character, with a consistency approaching that of a light oil. The fatty-acid chains allow many small, fat-soluble molecules, such as oxygen, to permeate the membrane, but they repel large, water-soluble molecules, such as sugar, and electrically charged ions, such as calcium.

    Embedded in the lipid bilayer are large proteins, many of which transport ions and water-soluble molecules across the membrane. Some proteins in the plasma membrane form open pores, called membrane channels, which allow the free diffusion of ions into and out of the cell. Others bind to specific molecules on one side of a membrane and transport the molecules to the other side. Sometimes one protein simultaneously transports two types of molecules in opposite directions. Most plasma membranes are about 50 percent protein by weight, while the membranes of some metabolically active organelles are 75 percent protein. Attached to proteins on the outside of the plasma membrane are long carbohydrate molecules.

    Many cellular functions, including the uptake and conversion of nutrients, synthesis of new molecules, production of energy, and regulation of metabolic sequences, take place in the membranous organelles. The nucleus, containing the genetic material of the cell, is surrounded by a double membrane with large pores that permit the exchange of materials between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The outer nuclear membrane is an extension of the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum, which synthesizes the lipids for all cell membranes. Proteins are synthesized by ribosomes that are either attached to the endoplasmic reticulum or suspended freely in the cell contents. The mitochondria, the oxidizing and energy-storing units of the cell, have an outer membrane readily permeable to many substances, and a less-permeable inner membrane studded with transport proteins and energy-producing enzymes.


    Is the diffusion of water across a selectively permeable membrane?

    The lipid bilayer of the cell membrane is an excellent example of a membrane which is both semipermeable and selectively permeable. Water passes through the semipermeable membrane via osmosis. Molecules of oxygen and carbon dioxide pass through the membrane via diffusion.

    Furthermore, what is the diffusion of water through a cell membrane? Water moves across cell membranes by diffusion, in a process known as osmosis. Osmosis refers specifically to the movement of water across a semipermeable membrane, with the solvent (water, for example) moving from an area of low solute (dissolved material) concentration to an area of high solute concentration.

    Similarly, it is asked, what is the term for the diffusion of water across a semipermeable membrane?

    diffusion of water through a semipermeable membrane is called: osmosis. the movement of substances from lower to higher concentration across a semi permeable membrane that must have a specific protein carrier and cell expenditure of energy is called: active transport.

    What is the diffusion of water through a selectively permeable membrane called Course Hero?


    Contents

    An example of a biological semi-permeable membrane is the lipid bilayer, on which is based on the plasma membrane that surrounds all biological cells. A group of phospholipids (consisting of a phosphate head and two fatty acid tails) arranged into a double layer, the phospholipid bilayer is a semipermeable membrane that is very specific in its permeability. The hydrophilic phosphate heads are in the outside layer and exposed to the water content outside and within the cell. The hydrophobic tails are the layer hidden in the inside of the membrane. The phospholipid bilayer is most permeable to small, uncharged solutes. Protein channels float through the phospholipids, and, collectively, this model is known as the fluid mosaic model. Aquaporins are protein channel pores permeable to H2O water.

    The diffusion of water through a selectively permeable membrane is called osmosis. This allows only certain particles to go through including water and leaving behind the solutes including salt and other contaminants. In the process of reverse osmosis, thin-film composite membranes (TFC or TFM) are used. These are semipermeable membranes manufactured principally for use in water purification or desalination systems. They also have use in chemical applications such as batteries and fuel cells. In essence, a TFC material is a molecular sieve constructed in the form of a film from two or more layered materials. Sidney Loeb and Srinivasa Sourirajan invented the first practical synthetic semi-permeable membrane. [1] Membranes used in reverse osmosis are, in general, made out of polyamide, chosen primarily for its permeability to water and relative impermeability to various dissolved impurities including salt ions and other small molecules that cannot be filtered. Another example of a semipermeable membrane is dialysis tubing.

    The semipermeable membrane is pertinent to cellular communication. A cell membrane consists of proteins and phospholipids. [2] Signaling molecules send chemical messages to the proteins in the cell membrane. The signaling molecules bind to proteins, which alters the protein structure. [3] A change in the protein structure initiates a signalling cascade. [3] An example of a technique that leverages membrane-based are tissue & cellular preservation technologies which show that adherent cells such as stem cells [4] and myoblasts [5] have better outcomes than non-adherent cells due to persistent signalling before and after preservation. [6]


    Osmosis plays a critical role in plant and animal cells. It helps in the distribution of nutrients and in the release of waste products. The living cells of both plant and animals are surrounded by a semipermeable membrane known as the cell membrane. The membrane forms a selective barrier between the cell and its environment and does not allow toxic substances from the surroundings to enter into the cell. The selective permeability allows the cell to regulate the flow of necessary substances into and out of the cell. In plants osmosis is also responsible for absorbing water and minerals from the soil by using the semipermeable membrane of the root.

    Hypotonic Solution

    These are solutions with low solute levels.

    Hypertonic Solution

    Solutions with high solute levels are known as hypertonic.

    Isotonic Solution

    If both solutions have the same amount of solute concentration they are then known as isotonic solution.


    Osmosis plays a critical role in plant and animal cells. It helps in the distribution of nutrients and in the release of waste products. The living cells of both plant and animals are surrounded by a semipermeable membrane known as the cell membrane. The membrane forms a selective barrier between the cell and its environment and does not allow toxic substances from the surroundings to enter into the cell. The selective permeability allows the cell to regulate the flow of necessary substances into and out of the cell. In plants osmosis is also responsible for absorbing water and minerals from the soil by using the semipermeable membrane of the root.

    Hypotonic Solution

    These are solutions with low solute levels.

    Hypertonic Solution

    Solutions with high solute levels are known as hypertonic.

    Isotonic Solution

    If both solutions have the same amount of solute concentration they are then known as isotonic solution.


    Osmosis

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    Osmosis, the spontaneous passage or diffusion of water or other solvents through a semipermeable membrane (one that blocks the passage of dissolved substances—i.e., solutes). The process, important in biology, was first thoroughly studied in 1877 by a German plant physiologist, Wilhelm Pfeffer. Earlier workers had made less accurate studies of leaky membranes (e.g., animal bladders) and the passage through them in opposite directions of water and escaping substances. The general term osmose (now osmosis) was introduced in 1854 by a British chemist, Thomas Graham.

    If a solution is separated from the pure solvent by a membrane that is permeable to the solvent but not the solute, the solution will tend to become more dilute by absorbing solvent through the membrane. This process can be stopped by increasing the pressure on the solution by a specific amount, called the osmotic pressure. The Dutch-born chemist Jacobus Henricus van ’t Hoff showed in 1886 that if the solute is so dilute that its partial vapour pressure above the solution obeys Henry’s law (i.e., is proportional to its concentration in the solution), then osmotic pressure varies with concentration and temperature approximately as it would if the solute were a gas occupying the same volume. This relation led to equations for determining molecular weights of solutes in dilute solutions through effects on the freezing point, boiling point, or vapour pressure of the solvent.

    The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica This article was most recently revised and updated by Erik Gregersen, Senior Editor.


    Watch the video: Passive Transport Osmosis (August 2022).